Welcome

To all those interested in the natural world. Please add your sightings.

In the woods we return to reason and faith-Emerson

Best-Lynn

Sunday, June 17, 2018

6-16 Yellow Sweet Clover

6-16
Yellow Sweet Clover, an alien species, is starting to flower.
Common Mullein is up in thickets and along roadsides.
Tiny blue flowers with conspicuous white palates make Blue Toadflax an easy species to identify
The pink and white clover-like flowers of Crown Vetch, another alien, dot roadsides and fields.
John
Yellow Sweet Clover

Common Mullein

Blue Toad Flax

Crown Vetch

Saturday, June 16, 2018

6-16 Tall Cinquefoil

6-16
Tall Cinquefoil, the only non-yellow cinquefoil, is flowering.
Harebell dangles its flowers from ledges.
Meadowsweet can be found in thickets and old fields.
Smooth Rose, a mostly thornless species with dull green leaves, colors river banks.
John
Tall Cinquefoil

Harebell

Meadowsweet

Smooth Rose

Friday, June 15, 2018

6-15 Motherwort

6-15
Motherwort, Feverfew and Chicory - all introduced species - are starting to flower.
John
Motherwort

Feverfew

Chicory

Thursday, June 14, 2018

6-14 Hedge Bindweed

6-14
The showy white flowers of Hedge Bindweed drape over thickets and weed patches.
Gray-stemmed Dogwood's creamy white flower clusters fleck roadside thickets.
John
Hedge Bindweed

Gray-stemmed Dogwood

Wednesday, June 13, 2018

6-12 Hop Clover

6-12
Hop Clover flecks fields and roadsides with yellow.
Purple-flowering Raspberry, a rose family relative, is coloring thickets and edges.
John
Hop clover

Purple-flowering Raspberry

Tuesday, June 12, 2018

6-12 Selfheal

6-12 Selfheal, AKA Heal-all is lifting its bi-colored flowers over weed patches an din roadside ditches
The yellow and brown flowers of Clammy Ground Cherry are opening.
A Viceroy butterfly posed nicely for a picture.
John
Selfheal

Clammy Ground Cherry

Viceroy butterfly

Monday, June 11, 2018

6-10 Knawel

6-10
Knawel, a homely plant with a homely name, is up in old gravel parking lots.
Japanese Pearlwort can be found in the same habitats.
Common Wood Sorrrel prefers mossy humus, usually along brooks and other wet areas.
John
Knawel

Japanese Pearlwort

Common Wood Sorrel

Sunday, June 10, 2018

6-10 Horse Nettle

6-10
Horse Nettle, a member of the Nightshade family, is starting to flower. It can be either white or pale lavender.
Rough-fruited Cinquefoil is in its full glory.
Box Elder bugs in several nymphal stages were busily doing whatever box elder bugs do.
John
Horse Nettle

Rough-fruited Cinquefoil

Box Elder bugs

Box Elder bugs

Saturday, June 9, 2018

6-9 Carrion Flower

6-9
Carrion Flower, so named for its odor, lifts its skeletal blossoms over thickets and along stream banks.
Whorled Loosestrife, the first of 5 or 6 yellow loosestrifes, is opening a few flowers.
And along river banks, Wide-leaved Ladies Tresses, AKA Shining Ladies Tresses, can be found.
John
Carrion Flower

Whorled Loosestrife

Wide-leaved Ladies Tresses

Friday, June 8, 2018

6-8 Lance-leaved Coreopsis

6-8
Lance-leaved Coreopsis, an escape from cultivation, is flowering brightly and Hoary Azalea, a fragrant Azalea with woolly leaves, is at its peak.
John
Lance-leaved Coreopsis

Hoary Azalea

Thursday, June 7, 2018

6-6 Yellow Iris


6-6
Yellow Iris, an escape from cultivation, is cropping up along rivers and in wet areas.
Indian Hemp is starting to ope a few flowers and its close relative Spreading Dogbane is not far behind. Dogbane is much loved by insects.
John
Indian Hemp

Yellow Iris

Spreading Dogbane

6-7 Bittersweet Nightshade

6-7
The backward purple petals of Bittersweet Nightshade give it a look of great speed!
Sheep Laurel, AKA Lambkill, can be identified by the new foliage overtopping its flowers.
And a newly emerged dragonfly hangs beside its too small-looking nymphal husk while its wings harden.
John
Bittersweet Nightshade

Sheep Laurel

Dragonfly and Nymphal husk

Tuesday, June 5, 2018

6-5 Indian Cucumberroot

6-5
The strange little, normally dangling flowers of Indian Cucumberroot are open.
And Caddisflies are airborne. There are 1260 known species in North America.
John
Indian Cucumberroot

Caddisfly

Monday, June 4, 2018

6-4 Creeping Buttercup

6-4
Creeping Buttercup's dark green mottled leaves make it easy to identify.
Sweetly fragrant pink flowers mark Alsike Clover.
John
Creeping Buttercup

Alsike Clover

Sunday, June 3, 2018

6-3 Mountain Laurel

6-3
Mountain Laurel is gearing up for its extravagant blanketing of Black Mountain.
Frostweed flecks the edges of the West River trail.
Cow Vetch is cropping up in fields and along roadsides.
And Spatterdock, AKA Yellow Pond Lily and Cow Lily, rises above ponds and stagnant setbacks.
John
Mountain Laurel

Frostweed

Cow Vetch

Spatterdock

Saturday, June 2, 2018

6-2 Pale Corydalis

6-2
Pale Corydalis lifts its head over sun-warmed ledges.
The delicate blue flowers of Common Flax - a locally naturalized agricultural species - dance in the breezes.
Small sundrops live up to their name.
And in woodland thickets and along shaded roadsides Maple-leaved Virburnum's lacy white flower umbrels attract pollinators.
John
Pale Corydalis

Common Flax

Small Sundews

Maple-leaved Viburnum

Friday, June 1, 2018

6-1 Orange Hawkweed

6-1
Orange Hawkweed is opening a few flowers.
Common Speedwell is not far behind.
Among the many butterfly species emerging were Silver-spotted Skippers.
And Carrion Beetles (Nicrophorus orbicollis) were burying a chipmunk as food for their young by removing soil from beneath the carcass and letting it sink into the hole.
John
Orange Hawkweed

Common Speedwell

Silver-spotted Skipper

Carrion Beetles on chipmunk